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TripAdvisor Launches Facebook App

TripAdvisor Launches Facebook App



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Local Picks app combines diner ratings with Facebook’s Social Graph

Travel website TripAdvisor has launched Local Picks, a new Facebook app that provides friends’ and locals’ dining recommendations for 850,000 restaurants.

Each restaurant has a detailed profile that includes a score from one to five on the Local Picks Index, a rating system whose results are based on the opinion of locals. The app is integrated with Facebook's timeline, so diners can share ratings, favorites, and themed lists with their Facebook friends.

Local Picks also has each restaurant’s basic contact details, including address, neighborhood, phone number, and website address. The type of cuisine, hours of operation, and photos are some of the information included from Foursquare and Facebook Pages, and menus are from Single Platform.

Local Picks features include a Foodies Feed, which keeps users informed of their Facebook friends' recommendations and real-time activity such as where they've checked in and what restaurants they've recently rated. Diners can also follow other foodies, like well-known chefs, outside of their immediate Facebook network.

A Local Picks Index ranks top restaurants worldwide, while a customizable list can be made by clicking "want" and "fave" buttons on the Favorites and Wish Lists.

Local Picks is now available to Facebook users in English, but more languages will launch later this summer.


Mobile applications no longer live in a silo – in many cases they are an important components of their businesses, along with their website. It's desirable for businesses to seamlessly connect their web presence and mobile applications, with links on a website launching mobile applications and displaying relevant content in the mobile app. App-linking (also referred to as deep-linking) is one technique that allows a mobile device to respond to a URI and launch a mobile application that corresponds to that URI.

Android handles app-linking through the intent system – when the user clicks on a link in a mobile browser, the mobile browser will dispatch an intent that Android will delegate to a registered application. For example, clicking on a link on a cooking website would open a mobile app that is associated with that website and display a specific recipe to the user. If there is more than one application registered to handle that intent, then Android will raise what is known as a disambiguation dialog that will ask a user what application to select the application that should handle the intent, for example:

Android 6.0 improves on this by using automatic link handling. It is possible for Android to automatically register an application as the default handler for a URI – the app will automatically launch and navigate directly to the relevant Activity. How Android 6.0 decides to handle a URI click depends on the following criteria:

  1. An existing app is already associated with the URI – The user may have already associated an existing app with a URI. In that case, Android will continue to use that application.
  2. No existing app is associated with the URI, but a supporting app is installed – In this scenario, the user has not specified an existing app, so Android will use the installed supporting application to handle the request.
  3. No existing app is associated with the URI, but many supporting apps are installed – Because there are multiple applications that support the URI, the disambiguation dialog will be displayed and the user must select which app will handle the URI.

If the user has no apps installed that support the URI, and one is subsequently installed, then Android will set that application as the default handler for the URI after verifying the association with the website that is associated with the URI.

This guide will discuss how to configure an Android 6.0 application and how to create and publish the Digital Asset Links file to support app-linking in Android 6.0.


Mobile applications no longer live in a silo – in many cases they are an important components of their businesses, along with their website. It's desirable for businesses to seamlessly connect their web presence and mobile applications, with links on a website launching mobile applications and displaying relevant content in the mobile app. App-linking (also referred to as deep-linking) is one technique that allows a mobile device to respond to a URI and launch a mobile application that corresponds to that URI.

Android handles app-linking through the intent system – when the user clicks on a link in a mobile browser, the mobile browser will dispatch an intent that Android will delegate to a registered application. For example, clicking on a link on a cooking website would open a mobile app that is associated with that website and display a specific recipe to the user. If there is more than one application registered to handle that intent, then Android will raise what is known as a disambiguation dialog that will ask a user what application to select the application that should handle the intent, for example:

Android 6.0 improves on this by using automatic link handling. It is possible for Android to automatically register an application as the default handler for a URI – the app will automatically launch and navigate directly to the relevant Activity. How Android 6.0 decides to handle a URI click depends on the following criteria:

  1. An existing app is already associated with the URI – The user may have already associated an existing app with a URI. In that case, Android will continue to use that application.
  2. No existing app is associated with the URI, but a supporting app is installed – In this scenario, the user has not specified an existing app, so Android will use the installed supporting application to handle the request.
  3. No existing app is associated with the URI, but many supporting apps are installed – Because there are multiple applications that support the URI, the disambiguation dialog will be displayed and the user must select which app will handle the URI.

If the user has no apps installed that support the URI, and one is subsequently installed, then Android will set that application as the default handler for the URI after verifying the association with the website that is associated with the URI.

This guide will discuss how to configure an Android 6.0 application and how to create and publish the Digital Asset Links file to support app-linking in Android 6.0.


Mobile applications no longer live in a silo – in many cases they are an important components of their businesses, along with their website. It's desirable for businesses to seamlessly connect their web presence and mobile applications, with links on a website launching mobile applications and displaying relevant content in the mobile app. App-linking (also referred to as deep-linking) is one technique that allows a mobile device to respond to a URI and launch a mobile application that corresponds to that URI.

Android handles app-linking through the intent system – when the user clicks on a link in a mobile browser, the mobile browser will dispatch an intent that Android will delegate to a registered application. For example, clicking on a link on a cooking website would open a mobile app that is associated with that website and display a specific recipe to the user. If there is more than one application registered to handle that intent, then Android will raise what is known as a disambiguation dialog that will ask a user what application to select the application that should handle the intent, for example:

Android 6.0 improves on this by using automatic link handling. It is possible for Android to automatically register an application as the default handler for a URI – the app will automatically launch and navigate directly to the relevant Activity. How Android 6.0 decides to handle a URI click depends on the following criteria:

  1. An existing app is already associated with the URI – The user may have already associated an existing app with a URI. In that case, Android will continue to use that application.
  2. No existing app is associated with the URI, but a supporting app is installed – In this scenario, the user has not specified an existing app, so Android will use the installed supporting application to handle the request.
  3. No existing app is associated with the URI, but many supporting apps are installed – Because there are multiple applications that support the URI, the disambiguation dialog will be displayed and the user must select which app will handle the URI.

If the user has no apps installed that support the URI, and one is subsequently installed, then Android will set that application as the default handler for the URI after verifying the association with the website that is associated with the URI.

This guide will discuss how to configure an Android 6.0 application and how to create and publish the Digital Asset Links file to support app-linking in Android 6.0.


Mobile applications no longer live in a silo – in many cases they are an important components of their businesses, along with their website. It's desirable for businesses to seamlessly connect their web presence and mobile applications, with links on a website launching mobile applications and displaying relevant content in the mobile app. App-linking (also referred to as deep-linking) is one technique that allows a mobile device to respond to a URI and launch a mobile application that corresponds to that URI.

Android handles app-linking through the intent system – when the user clicks on a link in a mobile browser, the mobile browser will dispatch an intent that Android will delegate to a registered application. For example, clicking on a link on a cooking website would open a mobile app that is associated with that website and display a specific recipe to the user. If there is more than one application registered to handle that intent, then Android will raise what is known as a disambiguation dialog that will ask a user what application to select the application that should handle the intent, for example:

Android 6.0 improves on this by using automatic link handling. It is possible for Android to automatically register an application as the default handler for a URI – the app will automatically launch and navigate directly to the relevant Activity. How Android 6.0 decides to handle a URI click depends on the following criteria:

  1. An existing app is already associated with the URI – The user may have already associated an existing app with a URI. In that case, Android will continue to use that application.
  2. No existing app is associated with the URI, but a supporting app is installed – In this scenario, the user has not specified an existing app, so Android will use the installed supporting application to handle the request.
  3. No existing app is associated with the URI, but many supporting apps are installed – Because there are multiple applications that support the URI, the disambiguation dialog will be displayed and the user must select which app will handle the URI.

If the user has no apps installed that support the URI, and one is subsequently installed, then Android will set that application as the default handler for the URI after verifying the association with the website that is associated with the URI.

This guide will discuss how to configure an Android 6.0 application and how to create and publish the Digital Asset Links file to support app-linking in Android 6.0.


Mobile applications no longer live in a silo – in many cases they are an important components of their businesses, along with their website. It's desirable for businesses to seamlessly connect their web presence and mobile applications, with links on a website launching mobile applications and displaying relevant content in the mobile app. App-linking (also referred to as deep-linking) is one technique that allows a mobile device to respond to a URI and launch a mobile application that corresponds to that URI.

Android handles app-linking through the intent system – when the user clicks on a link in a mobile browser, the mobile browser will dispatch an intent that Android will delegate to a registered application. For example, clicking on a link on a cooking website would open a mobile app that is associated with that website and display a specific recipe to the user. If there is more than one application registered to handle that intent, then Android will raise what is known as a disambiguation dialog that will ask a user what application to select the application that should handle the intent, for example:

Android 6.0 improves on this by using automatic link handling. It is possible for Android to automatically register an application as the default handler for a URI – the app will automatically launch and navigate directly to the relevant Activity. How Android 6.0 decides to handle a URI click depends on the following criteria:

  1. An existing app is already associated with the URI – The user may have already associated an existing app with a URI. In that case, Android will continue to use that application.
  2. No existing app is associated with the URI, but a supporting app is installed – In this scenario, the user has not specified an existing app, so Android will use the installed supporting application to handle the request.
  3. No existing app is associated with the URI, but many supporting apps are installed – Because there are multiple applications that support the URI, the disambiguation dialog will be displayed and the user must select which app will handle the URI.

If the user has no apps installed that support the URI, and one is subsequently installed, then Android will set that application as the default handler for the URI after verifying the association with the website that is associated with the URI.

This guide will discuss how to configure an Android 6.0 application and how to create and publish the Digital Asset Links file to support app-linking in Android 6.0.


Mobile applications no longer live in a silo – in many cases they are an important components of their businesses, along with their website. It's desirable for businesses to seamlessly connect their web presence and mobile applications, with links on a website launching mobile applications and displaying relevant content in the mobile app. App-linking (also referred to as deep-linking) is one technique that allows a mobile device to respond to a URI and launch a mobile application that corresponds to that URI.

Android handles app-linking through the intent system – when the user clicks on a link in a mobile browser, the mobile browser will dispatch an intent that Android will delegate to a registered application. For example, clicking on a link on a cooking website would open a mobile app that is associated with that website and display a specific recipe to the user. If there is more than one application registered to handle that intent, then Android will raise what is known as a disambiguation dialog that will ask a user what application to select the application that should handle the intent, for example:

Android 6.0 improves on this by using automatic link handling. It is possible for Android to automatically register an application as the default handler for a URI – the app will automatically launch and navigate directly to the relevant Activity. How Android 6.0 decides to handle a URI click depends on the following criteria:

  1. An existing app is already associated with the URI – The user may have already associated an existing app with a URI. In that case, Android will continue to use that application.
  2. No existing app is associated with the URI, but a supporting app is installed – In this scenario, the user has not specified an existing app, so Android will use the installed supporting application to handle the request.
  3. No existing app is associated with the URI, but many supporting apps are installed – Because there are multiple applications that support the URI, the disambiguation dialog will be displayed and the user must select which app will handle the URI.

If the user has no apps installed that support the URI, and one is subsequently installed, then Android will set that application as the default handler for the URI after verifying the association with the website that is associated with the URI.

This guide will discuss how to configure an Android 6.0 application and how to create and publish the Digital Asset Links file to support app-linking in Android 6.0.


Mobile applications no longer live in a silo – in many cases they are an important components of their businesses, along with their website. It's desirable for businesses to seamlessly connect their web presence and mobile applications, with links on a website launching mobile applications and displaying relevant content in the mobile app. App-linking (also referred to as deep-linking) is one technique that allows a mobile device to respond to a URI and launch a mobile application that corresponds to that URI.

Android handles app-linking through the intent system – when the user clicks on a link in a mobile browser, the mobile browser will dispatch an intent that Android will delegate to a registered application. For example, clicking on a link on a cooking website would open a mobile app that is associated with that website and display a specific recipe to the user. If there is more than one application registered to handle that intent, then Android will raise what is known as a disambiguation dialog that will ask a user what application to select the application that should handle the intent, for example:

Android 6.0 improves on this by using automatic link handling. It is possible for Android to automatically register an application as the default handler for a URI – the app will automatically launch and navigate directly to the relevant Activity. How Android 6.0 decides to handle a URI click depends on the following criteria:

  1. An existing app is already associated with the URI – The user may have already associated an existing app with a URI. In that case, Android will continue to use that application.
  2. No existing app is associated with the URI, but a supporting app is installed – In this scenario, the user has not specified an existing app, so Android will use the installed supporting application to handle the request.
  3. No existing app is associated with the URI, but many supporting apps are installed – Because there are multiple applications that support the URI, the disambiguation dialog will be displayed and the user must select which app will handle the URI.

If the user has no apps installed that support the URI, and one is subsequently installed, then Android will set that application as the default handler for the URI after verifying the association with the website that is associated with the URI.

This guide will discuss how to configure an Android 6.0 application and how to create and publish the Digital Asset Links file to support app-linking in Android 6.0.


Mobile applications no longer live in a silo – in many cases they are an important components of their businesses, along with their website. It's desirable for businesses to seamlessly connect their web presence and mobile applications, with links on a website launching mobile applications and displaying relevant content in the mobile app. App-linking (also referred to as deep-linking) is one technique that allows a mobile device to respond to a URI and launch a mobile application that corresponds to that URI.

Android handles app-linking through the intent system – when the user clicks on a link in a mobile browser, the mobile browser will dispatch an intent that Android will delegate to a registered application. For example, clicking on a link on a cooking website would open a mobile app that is associated with that website and display a specific recipe to the user. If there is more than one application registered to handle that intent, then Android will raise what is known as a disambiguation dialog that will ask a user what application to select the application that should handle the intent, for example:

Android 6.0 improves on this by using automatic link handling. It is possible for Android to automatically register an application as the default handler for a URI – the app will automatically launch and navigate directly to the relevant Activity. How Android 6.0 decides to handle a URI click depends on the following criteria:

  1. An existing app is already associated with the URI – The user may have already associated an existing app with a URI. In that case, Android will continue to use that application.
  2. No existing app is associated with the URI, but a supporting app is installed – In this scenario, the user has not specified an existing app, so Android will use the installed supporting application to handle the request.
  3. No existing app is associated with the URI, but many supporting apps are installed – Because there are multiple applications that support the URI, the disambiguation dialog will be displayed and the user must select which app will handle the URI.

If the user has no apps installed that support the URI, and one is subsequently installed, then Android will set that application as the default handler for the URI after verifying the association with the website that is associated with the URI.

This guide will discuss how to configure an Android 6.0 application and how to create and publish the Digital Asset Links file to support app-linking in Android 6.0.


Mobile applications no longer live in a silo – in many cases they are an important components of their businesses, along with their website. It's desirable for businesses to seamlessly connect their web presence and mobile applications, with links on a website launching mobile applications and displaying relevant content in the mobile app. App-linking (also referred to as deep-linking) is one technique that allows a mobile device to respond to a URI and launch a mobile application that corresponds to that URI.

Android handles app-linking through the intent system – when the user clicks on a link in a mobile browser, the mobile browser will dispatch an intent that Android will delegate to a registered application. For example, clicking on a link on a cooking website would open a mobile app that is associated with that website and display a specific recipe to the user. If there is more than one application registered to handle that intent, then Android will raise what is known as a disambiguation dialog that will ask a user what application to select the application that should handle the intent, for example:

Android 6.0 improves on this by using automatic link handling. It is possible for Android to automatically register an application as the default handler for a URI – the app will automatically launch and navigate directly to the relevant Activity. How Android 6.0 decides to handle a URI click depends on the following criteria:

  1. An existing app is already associated with the URI – The user may have already associated an existing app with a URI. In that case, Android will continue to use that application.
  2. No existing app is associated with the URI, but a supporting app is installed – In this scenario, the user has not specified an existing app, so Android will use the installed supporting application to handle the request.
  3. No existing app is associated with the URI, but many supporting apps are installed – Because there are multiple applications that support the URI, the disambiguation dialog will be displayed and the user must select which app will handle the URI.

If the user has no apps installed that support the URI, and one is subsequently installed, then Android will set that application as the default handler for the URI after verifying the association with the website that is associated with the URI.

This guide will discuss how to configure an Android 6.0 application and how to create and publish the Digital Asset Links file to support app-linking in Android 6.0.


Mobile applications no longer live in a silo – in many cases they are an important components of their businesses, along with their website. It's desirable for businesses to seamlessly connect their web presence and mobile applications, with links on a website launching mobile applications and displaying relevant content in the mobile app. App-linking (also referred to as deep-linking) is one technique that allows a mobile device to respond to a URI and launch a mobile application that corresponds to that URI.

Android handles app-linking through the intent system – when the user clicks on a link in a mobile browser, the mobile browser will dispatch an intent that Android will delegate to a registered application. For example, clicking on a link on a cooking website would open a mobile app that is associated with that website and display a specific recipe to the user. If there is more than one application registered to handle that intent, then Android will raise what is known as a disambiguation dialog that will ask a user what application to select the application that should handle the intent, for example:

Android 6.0 improves on this by using automatic link handling. It is possible for Android to automatically register an application as the default handler for a URI – the app will automatically launch and navigate directly to the relevant Activity. How Android 6.0 decides to handle a URI click depends on the following criteria:

  1. An existing app is already associated with the URI – The user may have already associated an existing app with a URI. In that case, Android will continue to use that application.
  2. No existing app is associated with the URI, but a supporting app is installed – In this scenario, the user has not specified an existing app, so Android will use the installed supporting application to handle the request.
  3. No existing app is associated with the URI, but many supporting apps are installed – Because there are multiple applications that support the URI, the disambiguation dialog will be displayed and the user must select which app will handle the URI.

If the user has no apps installed that support the URI, and one is subsequently installed, then Android will set that application as the default handler for the URI after verifying the association with the website that is associated with the URI.

This guide will discuss how to configure an Android 6.0 application and how to create and publish the Digital Asset Links file to support app-linking in Android 6.0.


Watch the video: How to connect TripAdvisor to your Facebook page (August 2022).