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Of Course Will Ferrell Is Back in the Old Milwaukee Super Bowl Commercials

Of Course Will Ferrell Is Back in the Old Milwaukee Super Bowl Commercials



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The ads just keep getting weirder and weirder

The weirdest Will Ferrell Old Milwaukee beer commercial yet.

Just when you think the Will Ferrell/Old Milwaukee magic has gone, another ad hits the airwaves and makes you giggle, cringe, and wish Ferrell would show up in all of our beer commercials.

Ferrell is back at it for round two of Super Bowl beer ads with Old Milwaukee; the ad (which only appeared in three city markets) isn't quite as graphic as the GoDaddy Super Bowl commercial with Bar Refaeli, but it's getting up there.

It shouldn't be much of a surprise that Ferrell continues to make these beer ads with Old Milwaukee, as not only did he tell AdWeek that he loves "good, crappy beer," but he's given total creative license to do whatever he wants in the ads. He said to Eater San Diego while on a pub crawl (of course), "Old Milwaukee makes a product to get you drunk; it's good in eight or nine or 10 samplings, you can't just enjoy one." We imagine eight or nine or 10 "samplings" of Old Milwaukee would make these ads that much funnier.


Super Bowl 2021 commercials: The ads people will be talking about

Sure, there's a game being played between the most decorated quarterback in NFL history (Tom Brady) and the most exciting young quarterback in the league (Patrick Mahomes), but, come on, you know you're tuning in to the Super Bowl for something more important than athletic greatness: the commercials.

While stalwarts Coke, Pepsi and Budweiser sit out this year's game because of the pandemic, the Super Bowl ads that are running make us laugh, cry, cringe and think. Here are some of the best of the best.

Here are the best 2021 Super Bowl commercials:

Frito-Lay

Brothers Peyton Manning and Eli Manning are among the legion of retired Super Bowl champions who take part in a story narrated by yet another retired Super Bowl champion, Marshawn Lynch, called "'Twas the Night Before Super Bowl."


Will Ferrell

Having played every variety of dimwit the English language has to offer, Will Ferrell moves onto Spanish with Casa De Mi Padre , where he plays the misfit son of a Mexican rancher. The rest of the cast is filled with native speakers, including Gael García Bernal and Diego Luna, but apart from the occasional fleeting reference, none of them seem to notice that the pale-skinned gringo speaks with a Southern California accent. That’s about the only joke the movie plays straight. Inspired by the threadbare sensationalism of Mexican telenovelas, the movie is filled with transparently fake sets and repurposed props, a fond tribute to the unintentional absurdism of low-budget filmmaking, which doubles as a prolonged conceptual gag. Ferrell recently sat down with The A.V. Club to talk about the joy of bad special effects, acting with his ass, and his viral Super Bowl ad.

The A.V. Club: Let’s start with the important subject first: Old Milwaukee. Seeing those commercials spread over the course of a few hours was pretty astonishing.

Will Ferrell: Pretty good, yeah. It is astonishing.

AVC: You had a good sense that something would happen with these?

WF: Well, that was the hope. Just to do this weird, under-the-radar campaign where it only aired in the markets that we shot in was like, “Perfect. Let’s do that.”

AVC: How did you end up shooting in Davenport, Iowa, and North Platte, Nebraska?

WF: We didn’t do it in North Platte. That was the one Super Bowl spot that we bought. We just, guerilla-style, got in a van and drove to these cities and filmed, and then got out before anyone noticed we were there.

AVC: What was the context? It seems like there’s some sort of broad framework for social-media promotion between Funny Or Die and Pabst .

WF: I just love Old Milwaukee. That’s my official answer.

AVC: So it was just “It’d be fun to do a series of bad commercials”?

WF: No, I just love a good, crappy beer.

AVC: There’s definitely a love of cheap, deliberately bad production values in those spots that dovetails with the moth-eaten stuffed tiger and wooden horses in Casa De Mi Padre.

WF: Yeah, even though they were separate, totally not conceived at the same time. I think there’s a certain amount of joy in seeing that in this world of CGI. It’s so funny, I see these CGI movies, and everyone says, “It looks amazing!” And I’m always like, “It looks terrible to me. You can see the outline of the thing.” I think it’s great, in the face of this world we live in, to kind of fall back into the celebration of bad effects. [Laughs.]

AVC: And non-effects, in the case of the big fight scene in the film.

WF: Right, and non-effects and lost footage, and owning up to that.

AVC: You shot on film?

AVC: So instead of using the RED, you’re shooting in “MexicoScope.”

WF: Yeah, and even on old lenses. That was one of the crazy parts of getting shot through this cannon on this movie.

AVC: Watching the movie, it seems clear that the fact that you’re speaking Spanish is not meant to be part of the joke.

WF: Right, that was the intention. I didn’t want that to be the joke. I thought it was just a funnier choice to me—a smarter choice, a more difficult choice—but that it would also potentially help us get a better cast. We wanted the language to be handled with care, and that it wasn’t a joke about wearing a sombrero and a poncho and things like that, even though some of the costumes have some of that flavor. It was more about all these actors in this movie giving “award-winning performances.” That was more the joke.

AVC: Gael García Bernal had an argument with Pedro Almodóvar while they were shooting Bad Education . He accused Almodóvar of “colonialism” for insisting he speak with a Spanish rather than a Mexican accent.

WF: Oh, really? Wow. That’s interesting to hear, because we were in Spain promoting The Other Guys , and I’d never been over there to promote. They’re like, “Please come over here. Why haven’t you come before?” We said, “We would love to, it’s just that the studio doesn’t send us.” It’s this whole cycle of, the more you go, the more you get in the eyes of that audience, but if the studio doesn’t send you, you don’t get to go. But anyway, I started talking about this movie with some of our hosts over there, and they were like, “You did a movie in all Spanish? Well, where is it set?” I was like, “Mexico.” “Oh, so it’s Mexican Spanish? Yeah, it won’t play here.” [Laughs.] They just openly said, “No, that kind of Spanish isn’t the right Spanish.”

AVC: It sounds, at least to someone who doesn’t speak the language, like your Spanish is competent.

WF: It is. It’s right there in the pocket of… I would check in with Diego, like, “How am I doing?” “Here’s the good news…” [Laughs.] “I can really understand what you’re saying. Your accent goes in and out, but the main thing is that you’re clear, you’re showing that you’re making an effort.”

AVC: You aren’t going to have to use subtitles for a Spanish audience.

WF: [Laughs.] Yeah, and I knew at the time that I’d be subtitled for the English-speaking audience. They’re not gonna know. So far, I’m getting pretty decent marks from the Latino press that’s seen it, which is great. That was the whole game plan. And then we hedged our bets in the script. We knew it wouldn’t sound flawless to native speakers, so that’s why we threw in the occasional—Pedro [Armendáriz Jr.], who plays my father, is like, “You speak so weird,” and things like that. So that was a way to call it out to the Spanish-speaking audience that we know that I’m not perfect, but that I’m kinda there.

AVC: Performing in a language you don’t speak gives you a lot to think about during a scene besides whether it works or it’s funny. How do you get past that?

WF: On one level, it was all I could do to just keep the words in my head. And if I missed pronunciation, we’d do the whole thing again, because we never wanted to loop it. We never wanted it to sound like I was dubbed. And then I just had to trust that what read in English would work on a comedy level.

AVC: Acting amid a cast of native Spanish speakers must be nerve-racking.

WF: Yeah, it was. I, at least, had the façade of confidence in the sense of, “Oh, this is just a comedy. This is a silly movie.” It’s not like we ever had a read-through or we rehearsed. I don’t think we did. But the scene where I talk about my idea of the perfect woman, that’s the first day of shooting. So I had to deliver that long monologue in front of Diego, Pedro, and Genesis [Rodriguez], and I was like, “Well, be careful what you wish for, because now you gotta deal with this. Here we are.” And I kinda surprised everyone. It was good. The script supervisor, who was bilingual, and obviously, the cast, were like, “You sound good. You sound all right.” I was like, “Okay. Phew.” So once I got through that day, it was like, “I think I can do it.”

AVC: You must have watched a lot of Spanish-language movies to prepare. Did that give you ideas for how to approach the character, other than how to speak?

WF: It informed us more in terms of look, and definitely the tone and the style of performance, yeah. But I also just knew that as long as we’re giving “award-winning performances” in every scene, then I’m on the right track—that we believe that this is the greatest dialogue. Diego said, “My character underneath my character was a really bad actor.” Even though it’s funny, because I watch, and I’m mesmerized by him. I think he’s so cool. He’s really naturally good, even though in his mind, he’s doing this over-the-top kind of thing.

AVC: Bad acting is certainly more interesting than mediocre acting.

WF: Yeah, it’s just really funny when it’s done well. Bad acting done well, does that make sense? [Laughs.]

AVC: Andrew Steele, the writer, and Matt Piedmont, the director, are Funny Or Die guys, and people you’ve been working with since Saturday Night Live . How much of the whole framework of Funny Or Die and Gary Sanchez Productions goes all that way back? Is there a comfort level with people you developed your sensibility alongside?

WF: Yeah, I was definitely doing this movie with two really good friends. And naturally, the sensibilities and the work styles all fold into what we’ve done at Gary Sanchez and Funny Or Die. Piedmont’s done stuff at Funny Or Die Andrew runs it, creatively. So it’s all interwoven. But in terms of the project, it was just the three of us who never once second-guessed an idea. We were all on the same page in terms of ideas we had and furthering the ideas. And then those guys just came up with other things that I wasn’t even aware were happening until I saw the film, in a weird way, because I was in such a Spanish bubble.

AVC: Not many people will get the Alejandro Jodorowsky references in the dream sequence, but it’s hilarious for those who do.

WF: That’s all Piedmont would study. Not to sound corny, like, “This movie’s for everyone!” but it’s weird: It’s got a lot of different stuff for a lot of different people, and yet it’s not a mainstream movie, either.

AVC: You don’t need a lot of grounding to laugh at the sex scene, which opens with several close-up shots of you and Genesis Rodriguez groping each other’s asses.

WF: It’s not arthouse.

AVC: Butts are funny.

WF: Yeah, we constantly put our foot on the gas in between a subtle reference, like you just mentioned, and just a big, fat comedy moment.

AVC: What is the secret to acting only with your ass, by the way?

WF: Just be very still. [Laughs.] You know what it is? The ass is more set up by the reverse [shot], where the hands do all the kneading and the chopping, and then you cut back to the ass, and it’s funny because it’s just sitting there. All the hand stuff sets up the ass.

AVC: The hands do all the work, but the ass gets all the credit.

WF: You gotta have both sides. And then, when there’s no other place to go, throw in a mannequin. [Laughs.]


Ad Snacking: Will Ferrell Speaks Swedish (Kind Of) For Old Milwaukee

Each week in Ad Snacking, fromer advertising executive turned chef Eli Sussman takes a close look at a recent food advertisement. He’ll keep the copy short to guarantee the R.O.I. for procrastinating at your desk stays high.

We live in a world where the celebrity endorsement is king. One tweet from Gaga or Biebs can yield huge results for a brand looking to make some noise in a very crowded market. In this week’s Ad Snacking, Will Ferrell’s Swedish Old Milwaukee commercial is a perfect partnership of absurd “viral baiting” humor hatched under the guise of a celebrity endorsement. This Halloween, all the PSY costumes are going to cancel each other out, John-Nash style. So take the best costume prize by suiting up as the handsome, mustachioed “Swedish-speaking” Old Milwaukee pitchman.

“I HAVE AN IMPORTANT BREAKING NEWS ANNOUNCEMENT! OLD MILWAUKEE IS OKAY!”
Product: B

I’ve never drunk Old Milwaukee, and I’d never heard of it before I saw the Will Ferrell Super Bowl Commercial last year. People don’t compare flavor notes of Bud Light to PBR and Keystone. Cheap Beer is cheap beer, and I imagine Old Milwaukee is no different. At the end of this ad Ferrell says in Swedish that Old Milwaukee “is okay.” We’ll take his word for it.

“I WAKE UP IN THE MORNING AND I PISS EXCELLENCE”
Message: A

Here’s how we prove a commercial is successful: 1. You share it on social media or saw it on a blog or 2. You are in a store confronted with a row of PBR, Budweiser, Keystone and Old Milwaukee. You consider the Old Milwaukee if only because you’ve seen the Will Ferrell ad. There’s a good chance you’ll buy it, just to try it. Either way, the brand wins. They’re in your head! And you can’t get it out. Not until you buy their beer and see what all the the hot blonde fuss is about.

“FILL IT UP AGAIN! GOD THAT’S GOOD! ONCE IT HITS YOUR LIPS!”
Creativity: A

For many guys, Will Ferrell may be the most quotable human being alive. Here he is with a luscious Ron Burgendy mustache, speaking in Swedish, riding on a boat with a babe drinking a ice-cold beer. Look’s good right? There’s only one way to describe this ad: perfekt kommersiella!


"Last Year's Lemons" from Bud Light

We can all agree that 2020 was a garbage year. With one disaster after the other, it's definitely hard to find any positives. Sure, 2021 isn't starting exactly how we'd all like, but it's definitely an improvement. So, it feels like an apt time to start finding the humor in the midst of all the garbage.

Bud Light's commercial sums up everything we feel about 2020. It begins with friends standing around drinking Bud Light Seltzer Lemonade. Admittedly, it feels a little bizarre to see a bunch of people at a party with no masks, but it does look like summer in the ad, so hopefully, it's a preview of what the future holds. Throughout the commercial, really bad things happen: A guy accidentally shaves off his hair, a couple's wedding gets ruined, and a cyclist crashes his bike into a pile of trash, all while it literally rains lemons. Sly references to the year's realities appear, like a wall full of canceled flights and a stadium crowded with cardboard cut-outs of fans. It finishes with a guy saying, "When life gives you lemons –" before he is brutally cut off by a woman who's had enough of the old adage after the year we just had. We see you, Bud Light Seltzer Lemonade. Well played.


GoDaddy Breakout Nerd’s First Post-Super Bowl Appearance: ‘Big Bang Theory’

The 34-year-old "world's greatest extra" spoke with Ryan Seacrest on Monday about how he nabbed the coveted job of kissing Bar Refaeli and what’s next.

Sophie Schillaci

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GoDaddy may not have received much positive feedback from their most recent Super Bowl ad, but actor Jesse Heiman seems to have come out on top.

The 34-year-old starred in one of Sunday&rsquos most talked-about commercials as the nerdy side of GoDaddy&rsquos business model to Bar Refaeli&rsquos sexy side. The duo proceeded to lock lips in a sloppy, saliva-filled make-out session for a solid 10 seconds.

&ldquoIt was like kissing paradise or kissing God&rsquos hands,&rdquo Heiman gushed Monday morning during an appearance on Ryan Seacrest&rsquos radio show. &ldquoI was just in awe that I got to kiss her but I really enjoyed it.&rdquo

And while Heiman&rsquos sudden relevance could open new doors (or at least prompt a mini-media blitz), viewers will be seeing more of him much sooner than expected. In fact, Heiman will return to CBS this month.

&ldquoI recently did an episode of The Big Bang Theory,&rdquo Heiman revealed during his interview, while a rep for the show tells The Hollywood Reporter that Heiman can be spotted in the Feb. 14 episode. Heiman has long been a member of the BBT family, appearing as an extra on the show for the past several years. His role in the Valentine&rsquos Day episode is also nonspeaking.

Heiman is, of course, already known as the &ldquoworld&rsquos greatest extra,&rdquo appearing in the background of countless film and television projects. On IMDb, he has 65 acting credits to his name.

Most recently, Heiman appeared as &ldquoConcession Kid&rdquo on The Mindy Project&rsquos &ldquoHarry & Sally&rdquo episode.


Watch: Cardi B, Serena Williams, Dolly Parton, John Travolta lead star-studded Super Bowl commercials

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Coke and Budweiser may be benched from in-game Super Bowl ads this year, but one Big Game advertising tradition is still going strong: the celebrity endorsement.

Serena Williams, Dolly Parton, Lenny Kravitz, Cardi B, John Travolta, Martha Stewart, Michael B. Jordan, Will Ferrell, Awkwafina and Mila Kunis, to name just a few, have been tapped by the likes of Anheuser-Busch BUD, +0.73% , GM GM, +1.77% and Uber Eats UBER, +0.75% to promote products while keeping viewers entertained during this somewhat subdued Super Bowl because of the pandemic.

Just 22,000 fans will be in the stands when the Kansas City Chiefs face the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Tampa, Fla. on Sunday attendance has topped 100,000 some years, and never dipped below 61,946 prior to the pandemic.

Public health officials like Dr. Anthony Fauci are also calling on Americans to stay home and avoid house parties that could become superspreader events, and many bars and restaurants remain closed or can only operate at 25% capacity as part of local lockdown measures in many places.

That’s why Satya Menon, who leads the return-on-investment practice at global analytics firm Kantar, told MarketWatch that she was expecting to see a strong celebrity presence among this year’s ads as brands “bring in the big league players to help break through.” There are even rumors that Fiat Chrysler IT:FCA has managed to snag the notoriously ad-shy Bruce Springsteen for its Jeep Super Bowl commercial.

And with ViacomCBS reportedly seeking around $5.5 million to $5.6 million for 30-second Super Bowl spots, falling back on popular celebrities is a tried-and-tested high-impact marketing tool.

What’s more, the tense and divisive social and political landscape of the past year has probably led companies to tread carefully in coming up with their commercial concepts this year, Menon said, and celebs are often a safe bet.

So expect to see stars — as well as plenty of humor — packed into the Big Game’s commercials this year.

“People do want a little more relief from all of the tension that is going on,” said Menon.

Here are some of the highlights:

Anheuser-Busch recently announced there would be no in-game Budweiser ads, but it has bought Super Bowl airtime for its Michelob and Stella Artois spots. The Michelob ad includes athletes like Williams, Anthony Davis, Jimmy Butler, Brooks Koepka, Peyton Manning, Billie Jean King, Usain Bolt, Arnold Palmer, Mia Hamm, Willie Mays and Wilt Chamberlain (phew) finding happiness in their pursuit of greatness, while the Stella spot stars Kravitz inviting viewers to invest in their 1 billion heartbeats by living in the moment — like, say, buying a beer.


Bob Horowitz On What Makes The Perfect Super Bowl Commercial: ‘Tugs On The Heartstrings’

(CBS)- Super Bowl Greatest Commercials returns for it’s landmark 20th anniversary tonight at 8:00PM ET/PT on CBS and streaming on CBS All Access.

CBS’ Matt Weiss spoke with Executive Producer Bob Horowitz to discuss the special, this year’s commercials and his all-time favorite spot.

MW: Hi Bob, nice to talk to you today! Super Bowl Greatest Commercials 20th anniversary airs tonight hosted by Boomer Esiason and Daniela Ruah. First question I want to know is what was it like working with those two?

BH: It’s an interesting question because Boomer, this is Boomer&rsquos 10th year hosting the show. In the 20 years we’ve had Mike O&rsquoMalley, we’ve had our buddy Jim Nantz host. Boomer&rsquos been doing the last 10 years and Dani the last five years. When trying to find a host and co-host for any show a lot of casting involved. You don’t know until the first time. Boomer and Dani started this five years ago and it’s only one day a year. We’re not talking about they come in for table reads like you’d see in a sitcom or in a drama, no. We hit the ground running and their chemistry was phenomenal, has been phenomenal.

I bring that up because all of a sudden, it’s 2020-2021 Super Bowl, COVID-19 and we’re figuring out how we are going to make this work. Boomer, we were going to have go to Tampa and host from there. Dani because of her NCIS duties wouldn’t make sense to go because she’d have to quarantine and miss too much work at CBS. At the end of the day, we didn’t send Boomer because CBS didn’t want to jeopardize that for the Super Bowl. We kept him in the NFL Today Set and had Dani in LA.

I bring it up because I was nervous what the chemistry would be. Sure enough, 3,000 miles away they were terrific. Dani loves doing the show. It’s not a payday for her. It is a love of working with Boomer and it’s a fun day. It’s terrific. They’re both great and hopefully next year with things safe Boomer and Dani will be back together on the 50-yard line at SoFi in LA which is where the Super Bowl is next year.

MW: We’ve all gotten pretty used to these zoom calls and doing everything virtually. It’ll be nice when we can all get back together in person and do it the old way, like in old world.

BH: Even have a little fun with it. The real hit at the beginning of the show, you think of all those experiences last year that we’ve seen or experience and obviously in stadiums. We’ve seen empty stadiums. Not foreign to us, the last 19 years we tape in an empty stadium.

That was good, but you know cut outs have been the rage. We had a little fun at the beginning of the show with Dani and Boomer hosting together from LA only it was really Dani and it was a Boomer cut out. That was our kind of touch on what’s relevant today.

MW: Was the cut out true to size? Boomer is a huge guy.

BH: We made it a giant, He&rsquos 6&rsquo5″ and I think we made him 7&rsquo5″. You’ll see the beginning of the show, that’s a great question. Yes, he’s a big guy and we also we have a surprise guest, we have Cedric The Entertainer on tonight. That’s great because this is the 20th anniversary of Cedric&rsquos day spot and he also stars in a new Super Bowl commercial airing Sunday.

MW: Awesome, it worked out 20 and 20. Those two are fantastic but it’s really about the commercials, so in your opinion what makes a perfect Super Bowl commercial?

BH: Simple. In terms of what makes a perfect commercial tugs on the heartstrings, really hits on that with emotional beats. Or it’s the laugh out loud. It&rsquos the hilarious spots that come Monday at the water cooler people are talking about it.

Usually, it’s also a formula where there’s one big line or one big turn at the end that just has you chuckling. You didn&rsquot expect that that line. The big stars of course obviously celebrities, that’s been the case and celebrities are going to come back and make some appearances again in the Super Bowl spots this Sunday and we have that in our show tonight.

It’s who are the stars, babies, monkeys, Clydesdales, puppies and thus we just launched the Mountain Do puppymonkeybaby. That’s where that came from. Those are the stars.

MW: They gave the formula away with that puppymonkeybaby. That’s really all you need.

BH: That&rsquos what it is. [laughs].

MW: What’s your favorite Super Bowl commercial of all time?

BH: I have to say the simple and I say it because you know the simple is what can be clever and be on message. FedEx years ago, did a commercial that was as simple as this annoying bars and tone that you see after a network or television station signs off where they have the color bars and that annoying tone.

There was a crawl across the bottom of the screen that said this is our 32nd spot in the Super Bowl our advertising agency convinced us to spend $1.4 million, that was the rate at that time $1.4 million, to buy a spot in the game. As a result, we produced a spot but in trying to get it to the network they decided not to use FedEx. The spot didn’t get to the network and we’re out our $1.4 million and the advertising agency is out of a client.

Just think about it. It was a slow time release because it was a crawl. It was bars and tone, so it was simple, probably cost $500 to produce. It was totally on message to FedEx which is if you want something to get from A to B and you need it there because you might have $1.4 million riding on it, best to use FedEx. That’s my favorite because it’s everything that makes a great Super Bowl commercial.

MW: Yeah, very simple brilliance there, I know for tonight viewers can vote for their favorite commercials online an then the results will be revealed at the end of this special. Where can folks go to see all the old commercials and to cast their votes?

BH: You can go to cbs.com. You can vote, then what will happen tonight on CBS at 8 EST 7 CST is we will countdown our curated spots as voted on by viewers at home, fans at home. People who had gone to cbs.com from 20 down to two. When we get to the final two Boomer and Dani are going to throw it out to America to vote live.

Watch this show you’ll see, by using a Twitter hashtag. It’ll be #SBGC, Super Bowl Greatest Commercials, followed by the name in a spot. That’s how America votes and then at the end of the hour we will disclose the winner.

MW: Awesome. Looking forward to it. Glad we’re finally almost at the big game and all the best on the special tonight!

BH: Almost there. Thank you very much and enjoy the game but most importantly enjoy the commercials!

MW: Thank you, you too, take care.

Tune in for Greatest Super Bowl Commercials 2021 tonight at 8:00PM ET/PT, only on CBS and streaming on CBS All Access. Check your local listings for more information.


The Bowlies: A Hall of Fame for Super Bowl Commercials

Hello there, my friends, and welcome to The Bowlies! If you’re not familiar with the concept (which you couldn’t be, given that it only existed in my head until a couple of days ago), allow me to introduce you. You’ve heard of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, right? The one that’s physically located in Canton, Ohio, where great players in NFL history are carefully selected by a credible, 44-person committee? Well, this is absolutely nothing like that.

No, The Bowlies are much more in tune with WWE’s Hall of Fame, where inductees are chosen at random, to be celebrated in a building that doesn’t exist. From inside its hallowed non-halls, we single out epic moments in Super Bowl commercial history, from food and booze to cars and controversy. Once inducted, these ads will be celebrated online as a legend, from now until whenever this CBS-affiliated website is shut down and forgotten…fun, right?

Without further adieu, let’s introduce the inductees!

Movies: Independence Day
Sure, by this point, most of us have watched the White House destroyed at least a half-dozen times. But in 1996, seeing the President’s residence explode after being zapped by aliens was as exciting as cinema could get. And that was before a good lot of you even knew who or what a Jeff Goldblum was too. Thus, Independence Day becomes legend as the first ever inductee…

Booze: Bud Light Starring “Jackie Moon”
When it comes to booze, The Bowlies could dedicate an entire wing to the cause. Yet while there are TONS of great beer spots that have aired on Super Bowl Sunday over the years, not all have held up well over the course of time. With that in mind, why not just go for the one featuring Will Ferrell, regardless of whether it doubles as an ad for one of his less funny films?

Food: Snickers Starring Betty White
She might be a bit of a cliché at this point, but given that this spot turned Betty White into a household name for millions of people who would’ve never otherwise known how awesome The Golden Girls was, this inductee seems like a foregone conclusion. And if seeing an old woman tackled into the mud still doesn’t make you happy, at least Abe Vigoda shows up at the end.

Condiments: Tabasco Sauce
Fact: as hot sauce goes, it’s a foregone conclusion that Tapatio trumps all, not just with a piece of pizza, but on everything. However, even Cholula addicts, as sad as they might be, would agree that Tabasco struck gold with its exploding mosquito. The newest member of the Bowlies, it’s easily the best condiment commercial since the Matt Le Blanc Heinz ads of the late 80s.

Controversy: Holiday Inn Starring “Bob Johnson”
Tim Tebow, Ashley Madison and whoever GoDaddy’s girl of the month might be ain’t got nothin’ on Kenny Bania! This one seems kind of tame in 2012, but back in 1997, Holiday Inn was really laying it all down on the table with such a controversial commercial. Plus, any spot relying on a Seinfeld bit player like Steve Hytner will always be a candidate for induction here.

Crowdsourced: Doritos “Crash the Super Bowl”
True, crowdsourcing is a cheap way for companies to sucker you into doing their dirty work, but seriously, how else are you gonna be able to get your funny in front of the rest of the world like this? No one knows that notion better than Doritos, who turned their million-dollar contest into a prize much more inviting than any McDonald’s Monopoly ploy could ever dream of being.

Cars: Audi R8 “Godfather”
In terms of commercials, cars are like beer: they’re so plentiful that it’s hard to single out one. Different than booze though, the auto industry is so damned concerned with coming across as cool one year that they end up outdated, dorky and pathetic 365 days later. Thankfully for The Bowlies, there are car companies out there like Audi who can pump out a good Godfather spoof.

Sodas: Coke “Chicago Bears”
Years before they used silicon starlets or Justin Timberlake to sell, soda companies had football. And while “Mean” Joe Green’s might be the more iconic Super Bowl spot, this year’s Bowly goes to the 1986 “New Coke Vs. Classic Coke” commercial, starring Jim McMahon and William “The Refrigerator” Perry. “You gotta keep a lotta Coke in The Refrigerator!” Damn right we do…


_________________________________________________
Of course, there’s only so much room for inductees this year. Have a favorite that didn’t get inducted? Let us know in the comments below!

When he’s not pumping out pieces for CBS, Elijah Bates provides creative direction for a social media company in Venice Beach. Otherwise, you’ll find him surfing up and down the California coast, evading stingrays like trips to the dentist.


GoDaddy Breakout Nerd’s First Post-Super Bowl Appearance: ‘Big Bang Theory’

The 34-year-old "world's greatest extra" spoke with Ryan Seacrest on Monday about how he nabbed the coveted job of kissing Bar Refaeli and what’s next.

Sophie Schillaci

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GoDaddy may not have received much positive feedback from their most recent Super Bowl ad, but actor Jesse Heiman seems to have come out on top.

The 34-year-old starred in one of Sunday&rsquos most talked-about commercials as the nerdy side of GoDaddy&rsquos business model to Bar Refaeli&rsquos sexy side. The duo proceeded to lock lips in a sloppy, saliva-filled make-out session for a solid 10 seconds.

&ldquoIt was like kissing paradise or kissing God&rsquos hands,&rdquo Heiman gushed Monday morning during an appearance on Ryan Seacrest&rsquos radio show. &ldquoI was just in awe that I got to kiss her but I really enjoyed it.&rdquo

And while Heiman&rsquos sudden relevance could open new doors (or at least prompt a mini-media blitz), viewers will be seeing more of him much sooner than expected. In fact, Heiman will return to CBS this month.

&ldquoI recently did an episode of The Big Bang Theory,&rdquo Heiman revealed during his interview, while a rep for the show tells The Hollywood Reporter that Heiman can be spotted in the Feb. 14 episode. Heiman has long been a member of the BBT family, appearing as an extra on the show for the past several years. His role in the Valentine&rsquos Day episode is also nonspeaking.

Heiman is, of course, already known as the &ldquoworld&rsquos greatest extra,&rdquo appearing in the background of countless film and television projects. On IMDb, he has 65 acting credits to his name.

Most recently, Heiman appeared as &ldquoConcession Kid&rdquo on The Mindy Project&rsquos &ldquoHarry & Sally&rdquo episode.


Watch the video: Will Ferrell u0026 Kristen Wiig hilarious presenting speech @ 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards 2013 (August 2022).