New recipes

Blue Cheese Gougères

Blue Cheese Gougères


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, cubed
  • 3/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2/3 cup all purpose flour
  • 3 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup finely crumbled Danish blue cheese

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 375°F. Line large rimmed baking sheet with parchment. Combine first 5 ingredients in heavy medium saucepan. Bring to boil over medium heat, stirring until butter is melted. Stir in flour; reduce heat to medium-low. Stir vigorously until mixture forms large dough clumps and film forms on bottom of saucepan, about 1 minute. Remove from heat; cool 5 minutes.

  • Meanwhile, whisk eggs in medium bowl. Transfer 1 tablespoon beaten egg to small bowl and reserve. Add 1/3 of remaining beaten eggs to dough in saucepan; whisk until well incorporated. Add remaining eggs in 2 additions, stirring until eggs are completely absorbed after each addition (dough will be sticky). Mix in blue cheese.

  • Drop dough by teaspoonfuls onto baking sheet, forming about 24 walnut-size mounds and spacing about 1 inch apart. Using pastry brush, brush each mound with reserved egg, flattening any pointed tops.

  • Bake gougères until puffed, golden brown, and dry, about 30 minutes. DO AHEAD Can be made up to 1 week ahead. Cool completely. Place in airtight containers and store in freezer. Rewarm on baking sheet in 350°F oven until heated through, about 5 minutes. Serve warm.

  • To make it easier to drop the sticky gougère dough onto the baking sheet, lightly spray the spoon with nonstick vegetable oil spray. To be sure that the gougères are fully baked, pierce the top of one with a small sharp knife. The inside should be hollow and dry. Don't underbake the gougères, as they may collapse.

  • A fancy party isn't complete without sparkling wine. With the appetizers, try the Cristalino Brut Rosé Cava from Spain. The pink bubbly is crisp and dry with lovely berry flavors. Plus, it's an incredible deal.

Reviews Section

Blue Cheese and Bacon Filled Gougères

When I made gougères a few weeks ago, upon first bite I immediately wished I had been more elaborate with the recipe. I liked the idea of the savory cream puff but an unfilled gougèr is basically equivalent to eating an unfilled Wisconsin State Fair cream puff. Who does that?

I saved the leftover gougères in a Ziploc bag in my freezer knowing that my dad would probably like a savory filled cream puff as much as I would. Our Christmas Eve appetizer was put together in a snap using my leftover gougeres (reheated for five minutes at 350 degrees) and the below filling.


Castello Summer of Blue — Blue Cheese and Pancetta Gougères

PARTNER POST – Get inspired with creatively crafted Castello Blue Cheese as we celebrate a Summer of Blue with #BluesdayTuesday.
Savory blue cheese and pancetta gougères are a puff of bold cheese flavor that are delicious on their own or as an awesome appetizer bites with a meat or greens filling to pair.
By Amanda Powell

I am very particular about my blue cheese. I don’t really have a good reason as to why I am so particular about how I eat my blue cheese, but I think a good part of has to do with the fact that I believe many ways people use blue cheese doesn’t fully complement the distinctive flavors. I think when used properly, blue cheese is one of the best tasting cheeses, and can really help certain flavors in other foods come out.

That is why I love adding blue cheese to gougères, which are basically savory cream puffs or profiteroles. These blue cheese and crispy and pancetta gougères may seem as though they are fancy, but they are actually so simple to make, and are great dinner rolls for a Tuesday night meal. You can eat them on their own, or spread a bit of butter on them, or even fill them with a number of fillings – my personal favorite being garlic-y collard greens and meat.

How Three Tequila and Mezcal Making Families are Celebrating Dia de los Muertos

Also, you can easily double the recipe, make them larger and use them as burger buns during a Tuesday night BBQ. Imagine a juicy burger sandwiched between these large blue cheese and crispy pancetta gougères.


Gougères (Choux Pastry Cheese Puffs) Recipe

Why It Works

  • Using temperatures to determine choux stages of doneness is more reliable than the traditional method's guesswork.
  • A 30-minute rest in the cooling oven after baking ensures crisp gougères that don't soften from the steam initially trapped within.

Gougères are small puffs made from choux pastry mixed with grated cheese, usually Gruyère or a similar French alpine cheese (though many other semi-firm cheeses, like cheddar, will work). They're baked until puffed and hollow, crisp and golden on the outside and tender within.

You can read more about the science and technique of choux in our guide to the basic paste. This recipe relies on all the same key steps: using an instant-read thermometer to gauge when the flour paste has been sufficiently heated, then cooling it just enough to safely beat the eggs in without risk of them scrambling. After that, we mix in grated cheese along with a pinch of nutmeg and black pepper, for extra layers of aromatic complexity. We also like to sprinkle a little extra cheese on top of each puff for an extra cheesy bite.

Gougères are a great snack either before a meal or alongside drinks—just make sure to serve them warm, as the addition of cheese means gougères are less enjoyable when they've fully cooled.


Recipe: Blue Cheese + Parmesan Gougères

Have lots of leftover little cheese nubbins? Make gougères. Not only are these bite sized savory pastries the perfect snack, they’re also easy to make and a great dumping ground for whatever you have languishing in your fridge.

For me, that meant a sad hunk of blue cheese and the remnants of a tub of grated parmesan. That’s about all that was in my fridge, so with just a few other staples I always have on hand (flour, some butter, and two eggs), I was able to bake up a batch of these babies in no time. And really, I mean no time.

Confession: I made these this morning and am posting about them now. That’s how fast these are.

Use whatever cheese, herbs, or spices you want to make the gougères your own. Get creative! The sky’s the limit here. Another fun fact: if you can nail the technique for making this pastry dough, called pâte à choux, you can also make eclairs, gnocchi à la Parisienne, profiteroles…the list goes on. One dough, endless recipes. Kind of amazing, huh?

Get the recipe and more photos, after the jump!

Blue Cheese + Parmesan Gougères
Adapted from David Lebovitz

1/2 cup water
3 tbsp unsalted butter, cubed
1/4 tsp kosher salt
a few grinds of black pepper
1/2 cup flour
2 large eggs
1/2 cup finely crumbled blue cheese
1/8 – 1/4 cup grated parmesan

Prepare all the ingredients and have them ready to go. You will not want to be scrambling once you begin putting these together.

Preheat your oven to 425. In a medium sauce pan, combine the water, butter, salt and pepper and heat over medium until the mixture is just simmering and the butter has just melted. Immediately dump in all the flour, and using a wooden spoon, start stirring the mixture vigorously, until it forms a smooth ball that pulls away from the sides of the pan. Turn off the heat and let sit for two minutes.

Transfer the dough ball to a glass bowl and crack in one egg. Begin mixing together (I alternate between a whisk and the wooden spoon to get things smooth). The mixture will look lumpy and very wet, then will smooth out and come together. Add in the second egg and repeat. If the dough seems a touch dry, add in a tiny bit of water to moisten. The dough should seem very thick and sticky. Mix in the blue cheese. (Note: you can do these steps with a stand mixer, but I think it’s just as easy to do it by hand)

Transfer the dough to a pastry bag with a round tip. Pipe the dough onto a parchment or silpat-lined baking sheet, making them about an inch or so wide. Sprinkle parmesan cheese over the tops of each, gently pressing down on any tips in the dough (so that they won’t burn). If you don’t have a pastry bag or tips, cut the end off a plastic freezer bag and pipe them out that way! Or, you can always use a couple spoons to shape the balls. They don’t have to be perfect.

Bake for 10 minutes, then reduce the heat of the oven to 375 and bake for an additional 15-20 minutes, depending on your oven (mine runs a bit hot, so they were done faster).

Serve warm with a glass of white wine (or whatever your beverage of choice is) and enjoy!


Blue Cheese and Crispy Pancetta Gougères

I'm kinda weird about some foods. I can't have chicken and eggs in the same meal. I love tons of sugar in my coffee, but never in my tea. I have to eat my M&Ms and gummy bears in a certain color order (and it isn't the same order for both of them), and although I bake with creamy peanut butter, I can't stand it on its own. I have to have crunchy peanut butter. I also can only eat blue cheese in certain ways. I can't have it in a dip with my wings, but I can eat it in a salad, provided there is chicken and berries involved. I can also eat blue cheese if it is in bread, but not on it as in a sandwich.

I don't really have a good reason as to why I am so particular about how I eat my blue cheese, but I think a good part of has to do with the fact that I believe many ways people use blue cheese doesn't fully complement the distinctive flavors. I think when used properly, blue cheese is one of the best tasting cheeses, and can really help certain flavors in other foods come out.

That is why I love adding blue cheese to gougères, which are basically savory cream puffs or profiteroles. These blue cheese and crispy pancetta gougères may seem as though they are fancy, but they are actually so simple to make, and are great dinner rolls for a Tuesday night meal. You can eat them on their own, or spread a bit of butter on them, or even fill them with a number of fillings - my personal favorite being garlicy collard greens and meat.

Also, you can easily double the recipe, make them larger and use them as burger buns during a Tuesday night BBQ. Imagine a juicy burger sandwiched between these large blue cheese and crispy pancetta gougères. Yeah, I had to wipe some drool of my chin too.


Notes

When making the choux pastry, it is important to be sure that each egg is fully incorporated into the batter before adding the next. Don't worry if the batter separates and looks curdled at first. Keep beating, and it will come together nicely.

Gougères freeze well. It might be fun to make extra with your club, so you can all take some home. After baking, allow them to cool completely. When you return home, spread the gougères out on a baking sheet, cover the sheet with plastic wrap and freeze them until they are firm. Then store them in sturdy plastic bags for several months.


Black Pepper & Blue Cheese Gougeres

Hello friends! I am still lost in my Smitten Kitchen cookbook. I want to make EVERYTHING. Deb (the author) likes to make things with interesting names. Things that I have never heard of before. These Gougeres (which I still cannot pronounce) caught my eye right when I saw blue cheese. And the fact that in her pictures, the dough looked very liquid-like before it went in the oven, yet they came out looking like a cross between a roll and a biscuit was very puzzling. I was interested so I thought I would give them a try. And let me tell you they were like puffs of blue cheese heaven.

First I melted butter, water and white wine. Then mixed that with flour, salt & pepper. Once it was combined I transferred the dough to a mixer.

Then mix that up and add some eggs! This will complete your dough. Scoop onto parchment or silpat and sprinkle with salt and pepper.


Roquefort Gougères

Preheat the oven to 425°. Line 2 large rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. In a small saucepan, combine the water, butter and salt and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat, add the flour all at once and beat vigorously with a wooden spoon until the flour is thoroughly incorporated. Return the pan to moderate heat and cook the dough, stirring constantly, until it pulls away from the side of the pan to form a ball, about 2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and let stand at room temperature, stirring a few times, until the dough cools slightly, about 3 minutes.

Add the eggs one at a time, stirring briskly between additions to thoroughly incorporate each egg. Stir in the cheese.

Transfer the dough to a pastry bag fitted with a 1/2-inch round tip. Pipe 1-inch mounds of dough about 1 inch apart.

Bake the gougères until golden brown, about 25 minutes. Turn the oven off and prop the door ajar to dry out the gougères completely, about 20 minutes longer. Transfer the gougères to a large platter. Serve warm or at room temperature.


French gougères with cheese (Appetizer Recipe)

French cuisine isn&rsquot really built for snacking, but when it comes to gougères, everyone is ready to make an exception. These delicious cheese puffs are a real treat.

Pronounced &ldquogou-jaire&rdquo, there is no English word for them, nor an english recipe equivalent. Gougères are small, hollow pastry puffs made with a doughy mixture of eggs, butter, flour, and cheese. It&rsquos basically puff pastry baked with cheese inside and it&rsquos amazing. The French cheese balls, if you will.

The cheese puffs are crisp on the outside, and slightly soft on the inside. They are a great as an hors d&rsquooeuvres or appetizer, or even a light snack. They can be served hot or cold, although I do tend to prefer them warm.

And they are amongst the easiest and most delicious appetizer recipes, you&rsquoll ever make. They also store easily, so you can make them in advance and serve them when you are ready.

There are various types of pâte à choux (choux pastries) in France, with gougères being the most famous of the savory ones filled with cheese. You may be more familiar the sweet viennoiserie and dessert versions of choux à la crème or pâte à choux sucrée that are filled with cream and sugar.

The Gougères recipe is said to come from the Burgundy wine region, where they were served cold as a snack when tasting wine in cellars. A gougère bourguignonne is actually a large gougère in the shape of a pie, rather than individual balls as finger food.

Every May, the town of Flogny-la-Chapelle in Burgundy celebrates the feast of the gougère with a festival featuring various fêtes, competitions, and exhibitions.

So with all that let&rsquos get to our favorite French appetizer, the gougères, shall we? Allons-y!


Watch the video: Easy and Delicious Blue Cheese Gougère Recipe (June 2022).