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Wild Truffle Found in Paris Rooftop Garden

Wild Truffle Found in Paris Rooftop Garden

A rare black truffle was growing on a rooftop garden, and now everyone wants to find more

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Black truffles were found growing wild in a Paris rooftop garden.

Paris has been trying to increase urban farming for some time. Now it’s probably about to get an enormous boost in rooftop gardens after news broke that a rare black truffle had been found growing wild on top of a Paris hotel, and now everybody is hoping there could be more.

Truffles normally grow further south than Paris, but according to the BBC, a black winter truffle weighing a little less than an ounce was recently found growing at the base of a hornbeam tree in a rooftop garden in Paris.

The garden belonged to the Mercure Paris Hotel near the Eiffel Tower, and Paris gardeners and mushroom experts were shocked to hear that a truffle was just growing there. According to the BBC, nobody has ever found a wild truffle growing in Paris before.

The hotel is certainly hoping to find and cultivate more truffles in the future, but it donated this one to the Museum of Natural History, where experts say they were tempted to taste it before getting down to the business of figuring out how a truffle turned up in Paris. Mushroom expert Marc-Andre Selosse said it was remarkable, and that if one truffle was growing on a Paris rooftop, there could be more.

"This shows that it could happen again and that it might be possible to cultivate truffles on Paris roofs," he said.

Black winter truffles are not nearly as expensive as white truffles, but they are still quite pricey. This year prices are reportedly up to more than $2,700 per pound. For anyone keeping an eye out for more unexpected wild truffles, here’s a guide to mushroom varieties.


Chickweed recipe: turning common weeds into gourmet food

We haven’t made any official announcements yet, but I (Aaron) am going to be managing a new farm for Oak Hill Cafe, a farm-to-table restaurant that’s scheduled to open in Greenville in 2018. (More on that soon.) Susan The Tyrant will be helping out some as well, and we’re also partnering with Chris Miller from Yeah, That Garden Guy on the project.

We’re beyond excited to put our years of growing & foraging knowledge to work on a larger scale, while introducing people to foods they’ve never experienced before!

Oak Hill Cafe is owned by a long-time friend, Lori Nelsen, a chemist at Furman University and a dang good cook & baker. The chef is David Porras, an insanely talented food artist from Costa Rica who trained at Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastian, Spain.

A dish created by Chef David Porras of Oak Hill Cafe for a pop-up dinner. Among the microgreens garnishing this dish are a few chickweed leaves! Can you spot them?

Weeds, Food, Culture, and Art

Every time we experience Chef David’s creations, we realize how little we know about cooking, and how basic ingredients can be made into exquisite creations in the right hands.

Our hope is that the team of people working on Oak Hill Cafe–from the farmers to the kitchen staff to the chef–can elevate Greenville’s restaurant scene to the next level while also connecting people to farm and forest-fresh foods, including edible “weeds” such as chickweed that grow wild here.

As part of our own self-education process, we’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in learning more about intensive organic farming as well as learning about how great chefs “tick.” One of our favorite resources for better understanding chefs is a show called Chef’s Table, a Netflix series. The show combines extraordinary storytelling and food education into highly entertaining 1 hour segments about each chef.

A few common themes that emerge:

  • each chef struggled with their unique ID early in their careers
  • each experienced hardship and
  • each ultimately had to connect deeply to the local region and culinary traditions where they lived in order to catapult themselves to the top of their game.

Southern Appalachia’s abundant biodiversity and edible wild plants

It just so happens that the area of the world where we live, southern Appalachia, is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.

Our native forests and grasslands can provide boundless supplies of gourmet and medicinal foods for those who know how to ID them. Adding to the rich native biodiversity in our region is an abundance of seldom-used edible plants imported by various waves of immigrants over the past few centuries: daylilies, kudzu, creasy greens/wild cress, and chickweed (to name but a few).

Some of our favorite imported cool weather greens: an understory of chickweed and sculpit growing beneath kale in our winter garden. All three plants were imported from Europe. Chickweed has naturalized throughout the country and grows abundantly in the cool months between fall and late winter.

While some of these imported plants have become invasive, such as kudzu, others are ecologically beneficial or benign.


Chickweed recipe: turning common weeds into gourmet food

We haven’t made any official announcements yet, but I (Aaron) am going to be managing a new farm for Oak Hill Cafe, a farm-to-table restaurant that’s scheduled to open in Greenville in 2018. (More on that soon.) Susan The Tyrant will be helping out some as well, and we’re also partnering with Chris Miller from Yeah, That Garden Guy on the project.

We’re beyond excited to put our years of growing & foraging knowledge to work on a larger scale, while introducing people to foods they’ve never experienced before!

Oak Hill Cafe is owned by a long-time friend, Lori Nelsen, a chemist at Furman University and a dang good cook & baker. The chef is David Porras, an insanely talented food artist from Costa Rica who trained at Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastian, Spain.

A dish created by Chef David Porras of Oak Hill Cafe for a pop-up dinner. Among the microgreens garnishing this dish are a few chickweed leaves! Can you spot them?

Weeds, Food, Culture, and Art

Every time we experience Chef David’s creations, we realize how little we know about cooking, and how basic ingredients can be made into exquisite creations in the right hands.

Our hope is that the team of people working on Oak Hill Cafe–from the farmers to the kitchen staff to the chef–can elevate Greenville’s restaurant scene to the next level while also connecting people to farm and forest-fresh foods, including edible “weeds” such as chickweed that grow wild here.

As part of our own self-education process, we’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in learning more about intensive organic farming as well as learning about how great chefs “tick.” One of our favorite resources for better understanding chefs is a show called Chef’s Table, a Netflix series. The show combines extraordinary storytelling and food education into highly entertaining 1 hour segments about each chef.

A few common themes that emerge:

  • each chef struggled with their unique ID early in their careers
  • each experienced hardship and
  • each ultimately had to connect deeply to the local region and culinary traditions where they lived in order to catapult themselves to the top of their game.

Southern Appalachia’s abundant biodiversity and edible wild plants

It just so happens that the area of the world where we live, southern Appalachia, is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.

Our native forests and grasslands can provide boundless supplies of gourmet and medicinal foods for those who know how to ID them. Adding to the rich native biodiversity in our region is an abundance of seldom-used edible plants imported by various waves of immigrants over the past few centuries: daylilies, kudzu, creasy greens/wild cress, and chickweed (to name but a few).

Some of our favorite imported cool weather greens: an understory of chickweed and sculpit growing beneath kale in our winter garden. All three plants were imported from Europe. Chickweed has naturalized throughout the country and grows abundantly in the cool months between fall and late winter.

While some of these imported plants have become invasive, such as kudzu, others are ecologically beneficial or benign.


Chickweed recipe: turning common weeds into gourmet food

We haven’t made any official announcements yet, but I (Aaron) am going to be managing a new farm for Oak Hill Cafe, a farm-to-table restaurant that’s scheduled to open in Greenville in 2018. (More on that soon.) Susan The Tyrant will be helping out some as well, and we’re also partnering with Chris Miller from Yeah, That Garden Guy on the project.

We’re beyond excited to put our years of growing & foraging knowledge to work on a larger scale, while introducing people to foods they’ve never experienced before!

Oak Hill Cafe is owned by a long-time friend, Lori Nelsen, a chemist at Furman University and a dang good cook & baker. The chef is David Porras, an insanely talented food artist from Costa Rica who trained at Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastian, Spain.

A dish created by Chef David Porras of Oak Hill Cafe for a pop-up dinner. Among the microgreens garnishing this dish are a few chickweed leaves! Can you spot them?

Weeds, Food, Culture, and Art

Every time we experience Chef David’s creations, we realize how little we know about cooking, and how basic ingredients can be made into exquisite creations in the right hands.

Our hope is that the team of people working on Oak Hill Cafe–from the farmers to the kitchen staff to the chef–can elevate Greenville’s restaurant scene to the next level while also connecting people to farm and forest-fresh foods, including edible “weeds” such as chickweed that grow wild here.

As part of our own self-education process, we’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in learning more about intensive organic farming as well as learning about how great chefs “tick.” One of our favorite resources for better understanding chefs is a show called Chef’s Table, a Netflix series. The show combines extraordinary storytelling and food education into highly entertaining 1 hour segments about each chef.

A few common themes that emerge:

  • each chef struggled with their unique ID early in their careers
  • each experienced hardship and
  • each ultimately had to connect deeply to the local region and culinary traditions where they lived in order to catapult themselves to the top of their game.

Southern Appalachia’s abundant biodiversity and edible wild plants

It just so happens that the area of the world where we live, southern Appalachia, is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.

Our native forests and grasslands can provide boundless supplies of gourmet and medicinal foods for those who know how to ID them. Adding to the rich native biodiversity in our region is an abundance of seldom-used edible plants imported by various waves of immigrants over the past few centuries: daylilies, kudzu, creasy greens/wild cress, and chickweed (to name but a few).

Some of our favorite imported cool weather greens: an understory of chickweed and sculpit growing beneath kale in our winter garden. All three plants were imported from Europe. Chickweed has naturalized throughout the country and grows abundantly in the cool months between fall and late winter.

While some of these imported plants have become invasive, such as kudzu, others are ecologically beneficial or benign.


Chickweed recipe: turning common weeds into gourmet food

We haven’t made any official announcements yet, but I (Aaron) am going to be managing a new farm for Oak Hill Cafe, a farm-to-table restaurant that’s scheduled to open in Greenville in 2018. (More on that soon.) Susan The Tyrant will be helping out some as well, and we’re also partnering with Chris Miller from Yeah, That Garden Guy on the project.

We’re beyond excited to put our years of growing & foraging knowledge to work on a larger scale, while introducing people to foods they’ve never experienced before!

Oak Hill Cafe is owned by a long-time friend, Lori Nelsen, a chemist at Furman University and a dang good cook & baker. The chef is David Porras, an insanely talented food artist from Costa Rica who trained at Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastian, Spain.

A dish created by Chef David Porras of Oak Hill Cafe for a pop-up dinner. Among the microgreens garnishing this dish are a few chickweed leaves! Can you spot them?

Weeds, Food, Culture, and Art

Every time we experience Chef David’s creations, we realize how little we know about cooking, and how basic ingredients can be made into exquisite creations in the right hands.

Our hope is that the team of people working on Oak Hill Cafe–from the farmers to the kitchen staff to the chef–can elevate Greenville’s restaurant scene to the next level while also connecting people to farm and forest-fresh foods, including edible “weeds” such as chickweed that grow wild here.

As part of our own self-education process, we’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in learning more about intensive organic farming as well as learning about how great chefs “tick.” One of our favorite resources for better understanding chefs is a show called Chef’s Table, a Netflix series. The show combines extraordinary storytelling and food education into highly entertaining 1 hour segments about each chef.

A few common themes that emerge:

  • each chef struggled with their unique ID early in their careers
  • each experienced hardship and
  • each ultimately had to connect deeply to the local region and culinary traditions where they lived in order to catapult themselves to the top of their game.

Southern Appalachia’s abundant biodiversity and edible wild plants

It just so happens that the area of the world where we live, southern Appalachia, is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.

Our native forests and grasslands can provide boundless supplies of gourmet and medicinal foods for those who know how to ID them. Adding to the rich native biodiversity in our region is an abundance of seldom-used edible plants imported by various waves of immigrants over the past few centuries: daylilies, kudzu, creasy greens/wild cress, and chickweed (to name but a few).

Some of our favorite imported cool weather greens: an understory of chickweed and sculpit growing beneath kale in our winter garden. All three plants were imported from Europe. Chickweed has naturalized throughout the country and grows abundantly in the cool months between fall and late winter.

While some of these imported plants have become invasive, such as kudzu, others are ecologically beneficial or benign.


Chickweed recipe: turning common weeds into gourmet food

We haven’t made any official announcements yet, but I (Aaron) am going to be managing a new farm for Oak Hill Cafe, a farm-to-table restaurant that’s scheduled to open in Greenville in 2018. (More on that soon.) Susan The Tyrant will be helping out some as well, and we’re also partnering with Chris Miller from Yeah, That Garden Guy on the project.

We’re beyond excited to put our years of growing & foraging knowledge to work on a larger scale, while introducing people to foods they’ve never experienced before!

Oak Hill Cafe is owned by a long-time friend, Lori Nelsen, a chemist at Furman University and a dang good cook & baker. The chef is David Porras, an insanely talented food artist from Costa Rica who trained at Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastian, Spain.

A dish created by Chef David Porras of Oak Hill Cafe for a pop-up dinner. Among the microgreens garnishing this dish are a few chickweed leaves! Can you spot them?

Weeds, Food, Culture, and Art

Every time we experience Chef David’s creations, we realize how little we know about cooking, and how basic ingredients can be made into exquisite creations in the right hands.

Our hope is that the team of people working on Oak Hill Cafe–from the farmers to the kitchen staff to the chef–can elevate Greenville’s restaurant scene to the next level while also connecting people to farm and forest-fresh foods, including edible “weeds” such as chickweed that grow wild here.

As part of our own self-education process, we’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in learning more about intensive organic farming as well as learning about how great chefs “tick.” One of our favorite resources for better understanding chefs is a show called Chef’s Table, a Netflix series. The show combines extraordinary storytelling and food education into highly entertaining 1 hour segments about each chef.

A few common themes that emerge:

  • each chef struggled with their unique ID early in their careers
  • each experienced hardship and
  • each ultimately had to connect deeply to the local region and culinary traditions where they lived in order to catapult themselves to the top of their game.

Southern Appalachia’s abundant biodiversity and edible wild plants

It just so happens that the area of the world where we live, southern Appalachia, is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.

Our native forests and grasslands can provide boundless supplies of gourmet and medicinal foods for those who know how to ID them. Adding to the rich native biodiversity in our region is an abundance of seldom-used edible plants imported by various waves of immigrants over the past few centuries: daylilies, kudzu, creasy greens/wild cress, and chickweed (to name but a few).

Some of our favorite imported cool weather greens: an understory of chickweed and sculpit growing beneath kale in our winter garden. All three plants were imported from Europe. Chickweed has naturalized throughout the country and grows abundantly in the cool months between fall and late winter.

While some of these imported plants have become invasive, such as kudzu, others are ecologically beneficial or benign.


Chickweed recipe: turning common weeds into gourmet food

We haven’t made any official announcements yet, but I (Aaron) am going to be managing a new farm for Oak Hill Cafe, a farm-to-table restaurant that’s scheduled to open in Greenville in 2018. (More on that soon.) Susan The Tyrant will be helping out some as well, and we’re also partnering with Chris Miller from Yeah, That Garden Guy on the project.

We’re beyond excited to put our years of growing & foraging knowledge to work on a larger scale, while introducing people to foods they’ve never experienced before!

Oak Hill Cafe is owned by a long-time friend, Lori Nelsen, a chemist at Furman University and a dang good cook & baker. The chef is David Porras, an insanely talented food artist from Costa Rica who trained at Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastian, Spain.

A dish created by Chef David Porras of Oak Hill Cafe for a pop-up dinner. Among the microgreens garnishing this dish are a few chickweed leaves! Can you spot them?

Weeds, Food, Culture, and Art

Every time we experience Chef David’s creations, we realize how little we know about cooking, and how basic ingredients can be made into exquisite creations in the right hands.

Our hope is that the team of people working on Oak Hill Cafe–from the farmers to the kitchen staff to the chef–can elevate Greenville’s restaurant scene to the next level while also connecting people to farm and forest-fresh foods, including edible “weeds” such as chickweed that grow wild here.

As part of our own self-education process, we’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in learning more about intensive organic farming as well as learning about how great chefs “tick.” One of our favorite resources for better understanding chefs is a show called Chef’s Table, a Netflix series. The show combines extraordinary storytelling and food education into highly entertaining 1 hour segments about each chef.

A few common themes that emerge:

  • each chef struggled with their unique ID early in their careers
  • each experienced hardship and
  • each ultimately had to connect deeply to the local region and culinary traditions where they lived in order to catapult themselves to the top of their game.

Southern Appalachia’s abundant biodiversity and edible wild plants

It just so happens that the area of the world where we live, southern Appalachia, is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.

Our native forests and grasslands can provide boundless supplies of gourmet and medicinal foods for those who know how to ID them. Adding to the rich native biodiversity in our region is an abundance of seldom-used edible plants imported by various waves of immigrants over the past few centuries: daylilies, kudzu, creasy greens/wild cress, and chickweed (to name but a few).

Some of our favorite imported cool weather greens: an understory of chickweed and sculpit growing beneath kale in our winter garden. All three plants were imported from Europe. Chickweed has naturalized throughout the country and grows abundantly in the cool months between fall and late winter.

While some of these imported plants have become invasive, such as kudzu, others are ecologically beneficial or benign.


Chickweed recipe: turning common weeds into gourmet food

We haven’t made any official announcements yet, but I (Aaron) am going to be managing a new farm for Oak Hill Cafe, a farm-to-table restaurant that’s scheduled to open in Greenville in 2018. (More on that soon.) Susan The Tyrant will be helping out some as well, and we’re also partnering with Chris Miller from Yeah, That Garden Guy on the project.

We’re beyond excited to put our years of growing & foraging knowledge to work on a larger scale, while introducing people to foods they’ve never experienced before!

Oak Hill Cafe is owned by a long-time friend, Lori Nelsen, a chemist at Furman University and a dang good cook & baker. The chef is David Porras, an insanely talented food artist from Costa Rica who trained at Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastian, Spain.

A dish created by Chef David Porras of Oak Hill Cafe for a pop-up dinner. Among the microgreens garnishing this dish are a few chickweed leaves! Can you spot them?

Weeds, Food, Culture, and Art

Every time we experience Chef David’s creations, we realize how little we know about cooking, and how basic ingredients can be made into exquisite creations in the right hands.

Our hope is that the team of people working on Oak Hill Cafe–from the farmers to the kitchen staff to the chef–can elevate Greenville’s restaurant scene to the next level while also connecting people to farm and forest-fresh foods, including edible “weeds” such as chickweed that grow wild here.

As part of our own self-education process, we’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in learning more about intensive organic farming as well as learning about how great chefs “tick.” One of our favorite resources for better understanding chefs is a show called Chef’s Table, a Netflix series. The show combines extraordinary storytelling and food education into highly entertaining 1 hour segments about each chef.

A few common themes that emerge:

  • each chef struggled with their unique ID early in their careers
  • each experienced hardship and
  • each ultimately had to connect deeply to the local region and culinary traditions where they lived in order to catapult themselves to the top of their game.

Southern Appalachia’s abundant biodiversity and edible wild plants

It just so happens that the area of the world where we live, southern Appalachia, is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.

Our native forests and grasslands can provide boundless supplies of gourmet and medicinal foods for those who know how to ID them. Adding to the rich native biodiversity in our region is an abundance of seldom-used edible plants imported by various waves of immigrants over the past few centuries: daylilies, kudzu, creasy greens/wild cress, and chickweed (to name but a few).

Some of our favorite imported cool weather greens: an understory of chickweed and sculpit growing beneath kale in our winter garden. All three plants were imported from Europe. Chickweed has naturalized throughout the country and grows abundantly in the cool months between fall and late winter.

While some of these imported plants have become invasive, such as kudzu, others are ecologically beneficial or benign.


Chickweed recipe: turning common weeds into gourmet food

We haven’t made any official announcements yet, but I (Aaron) am going to be managing a new farm for Oak Hill Cafe, a farm-to-table restaurant that’s scheduled to open in Greenville in 2018. (More on that soon.) Susan The Tyrant will be helping out some as well, and we’re also partnering with Chris Miller from Yeah, That Garden Guy on the project.

We’re beyond excited to put our years of growing & foraging knowledge to work on a larger scale, while introducing people to foods they’ve never experienced before!

Oak Hill Cafe is owned by a long-time friend, Lori Nelsen, a chemist at Furman University and a dang good cook & baker. The chef is David Porras, an insanely talented food artist from Costa Rica who trained at Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastian, Spain.

A dish created by Chef David Porras of Oak Hill Cafe for a pop-up dinner. Among the microgreens garnishing this dish are a few chickweed leaves! Can you spot them?

Weeds, Food, Culture, and Art

Every time we experience Chef David’s creations, we realize how little we know about cooking, and how basic ingredients can be made into exquisite creations in the right hands.

Our hope is that the team of people working on Oak Hill Cafe–from the farmers to the kitchen staff to the chef–can elevate Greenville’s restaurant scene to the next level while also connecting people to farm and forest-fresh foods, including edible “weeds” such as chickweed that grow wild here.

As part of our own self-education process, we’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in learning more about intensive organic farming as well as learning about how great chefs “tick.” One of our favorite resources for better understanding chefs is a show called Chef’s Table, a Netflix series. The show combines extraordinary storytelling and food education into highly entertaining 1 hour segments about each chef.

A few common themes that emerge:

  • each chef struggled with their unique ID early in their careers
  • each experienced hardship and
  • each ultimately had to connect deeply to the local region and culinary traditions where they lived in order to catapult themselves to the top of their game.

Southern Appalachia’s abundant biodiversity and edible wild plants

It just so happens that the area of the world where we live, southern Appalachia, is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.

Our native forests and grasslands can provide boundless supplies of gourmet and medicinal foods for those who know how to ID them. Adding to the rich native biodiversity in our region is an abundance of seldom-used edible plants imported by various waves of immigrants over the past few centuries: daylilies, kudzu, creasy greens/wild cress, and chickweed (to name but a few).

Some of our favorite imported cool weather greens: an understory of chickweed and sculpit growing beneath kale in our winter garden. All three plants were imported from Europe. Chickweed has naturalized throughout the country and grows abundantly in the cool months between fall and late winter.

While some of these imported plants have become invasive, such as kudzu, others are ecologically beneficial or benign.


Chickweed recipe: turning common weeds into gourmet food

We haven’t made any official announcements yet, but I (Aaron) am going to be managing a new farm for Oak Hill Cafe, a farm-to-table restaurant that’s scheduled to open in Greenville in 2018. (More on that soon.) Susan The Tyrant will be helping out some as well, and we’re also partnering with Chris Miller from Yeah, That Garden Guy on the project.

We’re beyond excited to put our years of growing & foraging knowledge to work on a larger scale, while introducing people to foods they’ve never experienced before!

Oak Hill Cafe is owned by a long-time friend, Lori Nelsen, a chemist at Furman University and a dang good cook & baker. The chef is David Porras, an insanely talented food artist from Costa Rica who trained at Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastian, Spain.

A dish created by Chef David Porras of Oak Hill Cafe for a pop-up dinner. Among the microgreens garnishing this dish are a few chickweed leaves! Can you spot them?

Weeds, Food, Culture, and Art

Every time we experience Chef David’s creations, we realize how little we know about cooking, and how basic ingredients can be made into exquisite creations in the right hands.

Our hope is that the team of people working on Oak Hill Cafe–from the farmers to the kitchen staff to the chef–can elevate Greenville’s restaurant scene to the next level while also connecting people to farm and forest-fresh foods, including edible “weeds” such as chickweed that grow wild here.

As part of our own self-education process, we’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in learning more about intensive organic farming as well as learning about how great chefs “tick.” One of our favorite resources for better understanding chefs is a show called Chef’s Table, a Netflix series. The show combines extraordinary storytelling and food education into highly entertaining 1 hour segments about each chef.

A few common themes that emerge:

  • each chef struggled with their unique ID early in their careers
  • each experienced hardship and
  • each ultimately had to connect deeply to the local region and culinary traditions where they lived in order to catapult themselves to the top of their game.

Southern Appalachia’s abundant biodiversity and edible wild plants

It just so happens that the area of the world where we live, southern Appalachia, is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.

Our native forests and grasslands can provide boundless supplies of gourmet and medicinal foods for those who know how to ID them. Adding to the rich native biodiversity in our region is an abundance of seldom-used edible plants imported by various waves of immigrants over the past few centuries: daylilies, kudzu, creasy greens/wild cress, and chickweed (to name but a few).

Some of our favorite imported cool weather greens: an understory of chickweed and sculpit growing beneath kale in our winter garden. All three plants were imported from Europe. Chickweed has naturalized throughout the country and grows abundantly in the cool months between fall and late winter.

While some of these imported plants have become invasive, such as kudzu, others are ecologically beneficial or benign.


Chickweed recipe: turning common weeds into gourmet food

We haven’t made any official announcements yet, but I (Aaron) am going to be managing a new farm for Oak Hill Cafe, a farm-to-table restaurant that’s scheduled to open in Greenville in 2018. (More on that soon.) Susan The Tyrant will be helping out some as well, and we’re also partnering with Chris Miller from Yeah, That Garden Guy on the project.

We’re beyond excited to put our years of growing & foraging knowledge to work on a larger scale, while introducing people to foods they’ve never experienced before!

Oak Hill Cafe is owned by a long-time friend, Lori Nelsen, a chemist at Furman University and a dang good cook & baker. The chef is David Porras, an insanely talented food artist from Costa Rica who trained at Basque Culinary Center in San Sebastian, Spain.

A dish created by Chef David Porras of Oak Hill Cafe for a pop-up dinner. Among the microgreens garnishing this dish are a few chickweed leaves! Can you spot them?

Weeds, Food, Culture, and Art

Every time we experience Chef David’s creations, we realize how little we know about cooking, and how basic ingredients can be made into exquisite creations in the right hands.

Our hope is that the team of people working on Oak Hill Cafe–from the farmers to the kitchen staff to the chef–can elevate Greenville’s restaurant scene to the next level while also connecting people to farm and forest-fresh foods, including edible “weeds” such as chickweed that grow wild here.

As part of our own self-education process, we’ve been trying to immerse ourselves in learning more about intensive organic farming as well as learning about how great chefs “tick.” One of our favorite resources for better understanding chefs is a show called Chef’s Table, a Netflix series. The show combines extraordinary storytelling and food education into highly entertaining 1 hour segments about each chef.

A few common themes that emerge:

  • each chef struggled with their unique ID early in their careers
  • each experienced hardship and
  • each ultimately had to connect deeply to the local region and culinary traditions where they lived in order to catapult themselves to the top of their game.

Southern Appalachia’s abundant biodiversity and edible wild plants

It just so happens that the area of the world where we live, southern Appalachia, is one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet.

Our native forests and grasslands can provide boundless supplies of gourmet and medicinal foods for those who know how to ID them. Adding to the rich native biodiversity in our region is an abundance of seldom-used edible plants imported by various waves of immigrants over the past few centuries: daylilies, kudzu, creasy greens/wild cress, and chickweed (to name but a few).

Some of our favorite imported cool weather greens: an understory of chickweed and sculpit growing beneath kale in our winter garden. All three plants were imported from Europe. Chickweed has naturalized throughout the country and grows abundantly in the cool months between fall and late winter.

While some of these imported plants have become invasive, such as kudzu, others are ecologically beneficial or benign.


Watch the video: Why Real Truffles Are So Expensive. So Expensive (September 2021).